Urban Poverty circa 1874

The New Shame of Our Cities

by Joel Kotkin — Urban revival views are more aspirational, than reflective of reality. Overall, data suggests that, with few exceptions, we are seeing continued movement from our large cities to suburbs and less dense cities.
The Hollywood Sign, as seen from a nearby trail.

Homelessness in Hollywood

by Alicia Kurimska — The allure of Los Angeles may be good weather, beaches, and the glam of Hollywood. However, the area has about 50,000 who are currently experiencing homelessness. This video examines the extreme inequality of the area.
SMU, Dallas Hall

College Graduates Concentrated in Suburbs, Highest Educational Attainment in CBDS

by Wendell Cox — The nation’s high-density central business districts of the major metropolitan areas have the largest shares of adults over the age of 25 with bachelor’s degrees or higher, consistent with popular perception. However, such a small percentage of people live in central business districts, that most bachelors degree and higher adults live in the suburbs.
Apartment building in Westwood area of LA.Photo credit: Brian Wallace

Killing the California Dream

by Randal O' Toole — Californians need to give up on their dream of a “ranch-house lifestyle” and an “ample backyard” and the state should become “more like New York City,” writes LA Times columnist George Skelton. After reading his article, the Antiplanner has just one question: Why?
Photo credit: Hatham Al Shabibi on Unsplash

The End of Aspiration

by Joel Kotkin — Since the end of the Second World War, middle- and working-class people across the Western world have sought out—and, more often than not, achieved—their aspiration. These usually included a stable income, a home, a family, and the prospect of a comfortable retirement.
Merced, California — now part of Bay Area Sprawl

Anti-"Sprawl" Bay Area Leads Expanding Metropolitan Regions

by Wendell Cox — This article examines metropolitan regions based on Office of Budget & Management boundaries. It illustrates that, despite the desires of planners and environmentalists to limit “sprawl”, labor markets continue to expand their footprint, particularly in the most regulated regions such as the Bay Area.
Photograph by D Ramey Logan: Aerial view of Rancho Santa Margarita

Restoring the California Dream, Not Nailing It's Coffin

by Joel Kotkin and Wendell Cox — Virtually everyone, including Gov. Gavin Newsom, is aware of the severity of California’s housing crisis. The bad news is that most proposals floating in Sacramento are likely to do very little to address our housing shortage.
Photo credit: Dllu — Pittsburgh at night

15th Annual Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey: 2019

by Wendell Cox — The 15th Annual Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey covers 309 metropolitan housing markets (metropolitan areas) in eight countries, rating middle-income housing affordabiliyy.
suburban housing growth

The High Residential Densities of California (and “Wild Wild” Texas)

by Wendell Cox — Despite their reputation for urban sprawl, the metropolitan areas of Texas have comparatively high residential densities, while the Los Angeles urban area is actually 30 percent denser, with much smaller lots than the New York metro area.
2018 Standard of Living Index, Top 20 and Bottom 20

2018 Standard of Living Index

by Wendell Cox — The Center for Urban Opportunity (COU) has developed a measure (the "COU Standard of Living Index") that estimates the purchasing power of real average pay in metropolitan areas compared to that of the average employee who moves to a new residence.