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Pervasive Suburbanization: The 2017 Data

by Wendell Cox — The most recent Census Bureau population estimates have made it clear that migration to the suburbs and away from urban cores has accelerated dramatically since the early years of the Great Recession.
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Suburbs Could End Up On The Cutting Edge of Urban Change

by Joel Kotkin — Overwhelmingly, suburbs are where most growth is happening. Since 2010 suburbs and exurbs have produced roughly 80 percent of all new jobs. Even tech growth is shifting...
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Landless Americans Are the New Serf Class

by Joel Kotkin and Wendell Cox — For the better part of the past century, the American dream was defined, in large part, by that “universal aspiration” to own a home. As housing prices continue to outstrip household income, that’s changing as more and more younger Americans are ending up landless, and not by choice.
Los Angeles Central Business District, by Doc Searles
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California's Middle Class is in Decline Despite State's Immense Wealth

by Amita Sharma — The California Dream of two or three generations ago was, `I’m going to move from a place that’s cold and flat to a place where there’s lots of opportunity,’” said Joel Kotkin, a presidential fellow in Urban Futures at Chapman University.
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The Screwed Millennial Generation Gets Smart

by Joel Kotkin — It’s been seven years since I wrote about “the screwed generation.” The story told has since become familiar: Millennials, then largely in their twenties, faced a future of limited economic opportunity
suburban homes
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Housing and the California Dream are at a Crossroads

by Joel Kotkin — For generations, California has offered its people an opportunity to own a home, start a business, and move up, whether someone came from Brooklyn, east Texas, Morelos or Taipei. That deal is still desired by most
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Suburbs & Exurbs Grab Nearly All Metropolitan Growth

by Wendell Cox — The pattern of suburban (and exurban) population growth in the suburbs and exurbs that has dominated the United States since World War II has returned and is intensifying.
Photo credit: Suburban Spaces by Laurie Avocado via Flickr under CC 2.0 License
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The Future of America's Suburbs Looks Infinite

by Joel Kotkin and Alan Berger — Just a decade ago, suburbia’s future seemed perilous; the head of HUD proclaimed that “sprawl” was now doomed, and people were “headed back to the city.”
Nashville's skyline at night
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Home is Where the Heartland Is

By Lydia DePillis Joel Kotkin is out with a manifesto on the New Heartland, capital H: The belt of states running north from Minnesota and Ohio south to Texas and Florida. Everything, that is, besides the West, the Northeast, and the Mid-Atlantic.
Alan and Joel
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Preparing for the Infinite Suburb

Hyperloop-One has a Q&A with Alan Berger and Joel Kotkin, co-authors of an upcoming book titled "Infinite Suburbia". This is the third in a series of conversations during Infrastructure Week.